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New YA Picks

Date posted: July 22, 2019, 5:36 pm

Wondering what’s new in YA? We have some exciting new releases at the library for young adults, or anyone who loves a good story. A Chilling Adventures of Sabrina prequel novel, an apocalyptic suspense novel inspired by The Lord of the Flies, a magical story of friendship, and a dark fairy tale novel based on the movie Pan’s Labyrinth. Put one on hold today!

These are our picks for July:

Season of the Witch by Sarah Rees Brennan
Keywords: Fantasy, Witches, Comic Book Adaptations, Friendship

It’s the summer before her sixteenth birthday, and Sabrina Spellman knows her world is about to change. She’s always studied magic and spells with her aunts, Hilda and Zelda. But she’s also lived a normal mortal life — attending Baxter High, hanging out with her friends Susie and Roz, and going to the movies with her boyfriend, Harvey Kinkle.

Now time is running out on her everyday, normal world, and leaving behind Roz and Susie and Harvey is a lot harder than she thought it would be. Especially because Sabrina isn’t sure how Harvey feels about her. Her cousin Ambrose suggests performing a spell to discover Harvey’s true feelings. But when a mysterious wood spirit interferes, the spell backfires… in a big way.

Sabrina has always been attracted to the power of being a witch. But now she can’t help wondering if that power is leading her down the wrong path. Will she choose to forsake the path of light and follow the path of night?

A creepy literary adaptation to please existing Sabrina fans and that may entice new ones. –Kirkus Review (5/22/19)

Wilder Girls by Rory Power
Keywords: Suspense, Apocalypse, Female Friendships, Pandemics, LGBTQIA Characters

It’s been eighteen months since the Raxter School for Girls was put under quarantine. Since the Tox hit and pulled Hetty’s life out from under her.

It started slow. First the teachers died one by one. Then it began to infect the students, turning their bodies strange and foreign. Now, cut off from the rest of the world and left to fend for themselves on their island home, the girls don’t dare wander outside the school’s fence, where the Tox has made the woods wild and dangerous. They wait for the cure they were promised as the Tox seeps into everything.

But when Byatt goes missing, Hetty will do anything to find her, even if it means breaking quarantine and braving the horrors that lie beyond the fence. And when she does, Hetty learns that there’s more to their story, to their life at Raxter, than she could have ever thought true.

Power’s evocative, haunting, and occasionally gruesome debut will challenge readers to ignore its bewitching presence. –Booklist (5/1/19)

The Boy and Girl Who Broke the World by Amy Reed
Keywords: Magical Realism, Friendship, Self-love

Billy Sloat and Lydia Lemon don’t have much in common, unless you count growing up on the same (wrong) side of the tracks, the lack of a mother, and a persistent loneliness that has inspired creative coping mechanisms.

When the lives of these two loners are thrust together, Lydia’s cynicism is met with Billy’s sincere optimism, and both begin to question their own outlook on life. On top of that, weird happenings including an impossible tornado and an all-consuming fog are cropping up around them—maybe even because of them. And as the two grow closer and confront bigger truths about their pasts, they must also deal with such inconveniences as a narcissistic rock star, a war between unicorns and dragons, and eventually, of course, the apocalypse.

Surreal, bizarre, yet ultimately comforting. –Kirkus Review (4/22/19)

Pan’s Labyrinth: The Labyrinth of the Faun by Guillermo del Toro and Cornelia Funke
Keywords: Fairy Tales, Fantasy, Forests

This spellbinding tale takes readers to a sinister, magical, and war-torn world filled with richly drawn characters like trickster fauns, murderous soldiers, child-eating monsters, courageous rebels, and a long-lost princess hoping to be reunited with her family.

A brilliant collaboration between masterful storytellers that’s not to be missed.

Dark and mesmerizing. –Kirkus Reviews (4/22/19)